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  1. Earlier
  2. Brian007

    Myrin MFing man

    Oh yeah
  3. Expert 6

    Gene therapy

    If gene therapy is overshadowed by risk, does this mean stem cell modification is dangerous?
  4. Expert 6

    Maternal factors

    I strongly disagree with your assertion.
  5. Expert 5

    Maternal factors

    Determining factors can conclude external dependencies.
  6. Expert 5

    Early signs

    Behavioral issues has to be determined before prognosis.
  7. Autistic Adult Living

    Gene therapy

    Awesome article
  8. Expert 1

    Gene therapy

    For the past two decades, the promise of gene therapy has largely been overshadowed by the risks. But the approach is making a comeback. This year, several animal studies highlighted gene therapy’s potential for reversing features of autism-related conditions, such as Rett syndrome. One team of researchers used a virus to deliver the Rett syndrome gene MECP2 into mice and monkeys, easing features of the syndrome and improving the mice’s survival. Another team delivered a fragment of the gene, and found that this eases Rett-like features in adult mice. This ‘mini-gene therapy’ approach raises the possibility of treating the condition beyond childhood, and may sidestep problems associated with having too much MECP2.
  9. Expert 1

    Early signs

    Most behavioral features of autism aren’t apparent in the first year of life, so many teams are looking for subtle biomarkers of brain and behavior that emerge in infancy. Several studies this year revealed atypical patterns of brain growth, activity and connectivity in infants later diagnosed with autism. In February, one study found that children with autism show rapid brain growth in the first year of life, and those with the fastest brain growth have the most severe autism features at age 2. A study in June then reported that patterns of brain activity in 6-month-old babies can accurately predict which ones will later be diagnosed with autism. And a study in August found that children diagnosed with autism show atypical connections between brain regions in the first year of life.
  10. Expert 1

    Maternal factors

    Epidemiological studies have linked exposures to certain drugs or immune reactions during pregnancy to an increased risk of autism, but the biological mechanisms underlying these associations have been unclear. This year, researchers broke new ground in understanding how maternal infections may derail fetal brain development, potentially leading to autism. A pair of mouse studies revealed that inflammatory molecules released to combat infections can cross into the placenta and lead to patches of abnormal brain tissue in the pups. Intriguingly, changing the maternal microbiome — the landscape of gut bacteria in the mother mouse — seems to prevent the development of these patches in her pups.
  11. Autistic Adult Living

    Maximizing Autism Outreach

    can't wait until next event
  12. Autistic Adult Living

    Maximizing Autism Outreach

    best event ever
  13. Autistic Adult Living

    Maximizing Autism Outreach

    love this event
  14. Autistic Adult Living

    Maximizing Autism Outreach

    this event rocks
  15. Autistic Adult Living

    Maximizing Autism Outreach

  16. Autistic Adult Living

    Autism Speaks

    This is an excellent conference to attend.
  17. Autistic Adult Living

    Becoming a Caregiver

  18. Autistic Adult Living

    Learn Traits of Autism

  19. Autistic Adult Living

    Autism Speaks

    Autism Speaks
  20. Autistic Adult Living

    What is Autism?

    What is Autism? Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and autism are both general terms for a group of complex disorders of brain development characterized, in varying degrees, by dif culties in social interaction, verbal and nonverbal communication and repetitive behaviors. Though there are strengths and unique abilities associated with the disorder, autism is most often de ned based on “de cits” and “symptoms” because the de nition from the American Psychiatric Association’s Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) is science-based and the manual is used to describe disorders for diagnosis. With the May 2013 publication of the fth edition of the DSM (commonly referred to as the DSM-5), all autism disorders were merged under one umbrella diagnosis ofASD. Previously, they were recognized as distinct subtypes, including autistic disorder, childhood disintegrative disorder, pervasive developmental disorder-not otherwise speci ed (PDD-NOS) and Asperger Syndrome. Individuals with well- established diagnoses of these disorders prior to the publication of the DSM-5 should now be given the diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder. Under the current DSM-5, there are two domains where people with ASD must show persistent de cits. They include: 1. persistent social communication and social interaction 2. restricted and repetitive patterns of behavior More speci cally, people with ASD must demonstrate de cits (either in the past or in the present) in social- emotional reciprocity, nonverbal communicative behaviors used for social interaction, as well as de cits in developing, maintaining and understanding relationships. In addition, they must show at least two types of repetitive patterns of behavior including: stereotyped or repetitive motor movements insistence on sameness or in exible adherence to routines highly restricted, xated interests hyper- or hypo-reactivity to sensory input or unusual interest in sensory aspects of the environment The DSM-5 also added an additional category called Social Communication Disorder (SCD). This allows for a diagnosis of disabilities in social communication, without the presence of repetitive behavior. SCD is a new diagnosis and much more research and information is needed to better understand it. There are currently few guidelines for the treatment of SCD. Until such guidelines become available, treatments that target social-communication, including many autism-speci c interventions, should be provided to individuals with SCD. To read the whole DSM-5 criteria, please visit autismspeaks.org/dsm-5.
  21. You’ve always felt different, but didn’t know why. An autism spectrum disorder diagnosis can help shine a light on why certain things have always been difficult, while others came easily. If you suspect you might have ASD, start here. ASD occurs in all age, racial, ethnic, and socioeconomic groups. It is generally characterized by social and communication difficulties and by repetitive behaviors. More severe forms of ASD are often diagnosed in the first two years of a child’s life, but less severe forms may be diagnosed much later in life. Symptoms occur in three main areas: Social interactions Verbal and nonverbal communication Repetitive or ritualistic behaviors Adults with autism can be high functioning and have only mild challenges, or they can have more severe symptoms, like impaired spoken language, that interfere with everyday life. No two people with ASD will have the same symptoms manifested in the same way. More people than ever are being diagnosed with ASD Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is typically a lifelong condition, though a small percentage of children do outgrow it thanks to early diagnosis and treatment. Common symptoms of ASD in adults include: Difficulty interpreting what others are thinking or feeling Trouble interpreting facial expressions, body language, or social cues Difficulty regulating emotion Trouble keeping up a conversation Inflection that does not reflect feelings Difficulty maintaining the natural give-and-take of a conversation; prone to monologues on a favorite subject Tendency to engage in repetitive or routine behaviors Only participates in a restricted range of activities Strict consistency to daily routines; outbursts when changes occur Deep knowledge of one particular topic, such as a certain branch of science or industry Adults can also exhibit repetitive behaviors and have specific, extreme interest in a particular topic like a sports teams or area of history. These interests may border on obsessions. Symptoms at Home Other peoples’ feelings baffle you. You have a collection of figurines on your desk that must be in the same order at all times. These, and other common manifestations of ASD, may be apparent in adults at home: Your family members lovingly refer to you as the “eccentric professor” of the family, even though you don’t work in academia. You’ve always wanted a best friend, but never found one. You often invent your own words and expressions to describe things. Even when you’re in a quiet place, like the library, you find yourself making involuntary noises like clearing your throat over and over. You follow the same schedule every day of the week, and don’t like unexpected events. Expressions like, “Curiosity killed the cat” or “Don’t count your chickens before they hatch” are confusing to you. You are always bumping into things and tripping over your own feet. In your leisure time, you prefer to play individual games and sports, like golf, where everyone works for themselves instead of working toward a common goal on a team. Symptoms at Work Symptoms of ASD vary greatly from person to person based on the severity of the condition. These or similar manifestations of ASD may be apparent at work: When you’re having a conversation with your boss, you prefer to look at the wall, her shoes, or anywhere but directly into her eyes. Your co-workers say that you speak like a robot. Each item on your desk has a special place, and you don’t like when the cleaning company rearranges it to dust. You are really good at math, or software coding, but struggle to succeed in other areas. You talk to your co-workers the same way you talk with your family and friends. During meetings, you find yourself making involuntary noises, like clearing your throat over and over. When talking with your boss, you have difficulty telling if he is happy with your performance or mad at you. In addition, individuals with ASD may exhibit extraordinary talents in visual skills, music, math, and art. And roughly 40 percent of individuals with ASD have average or above-average intelligence. If you experience these or similar symptoms of ASD, consult a doctor or mental-health professional for a formal assessment.
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